What’s Your Birth Plan? Factors and Questions You Should Consider Aski - Dressed To Deliver

What’s Your Birth Plan? Factors and Questions You Should Consider Asking


by Julie Berg November 08, 2017

By this time, you’ve probably thought of a lot of things. What your baby’s name would be, who they’d take after (you, of course!) and even what their gurgles and giggles will sound like.

But before all that happiness and adorableness ensues, the main thing you need to focus on is bringing your baby into this world, and that is done by organizing a perfect birth plan.

What is a Birth Plan and why do You Need it?

A birth plan is simply that – a complete strategy that allows you to plan your goals before, during and after your labor and delivery. This is basically a game plan that allows you to list all the particulars needed for a satisfying birthing scenario. It will include what’s practical and what the hospital can accommodate.

The birth plan must also stave off any unrealistic expectations for the parent so there is no miscommunication between the mother and the practitioner afterwards.

Details about Your Birth Plan

Keep in mind that though a birth plan is viable, things might not go exactly how you plan them. Any small detail could prompt a change so don’t be dead set on meeting all of your goals. Being flexible is one of the most important parts of having a good birth plan. Remember; your child’s birth may be unpredictable.

However, to make sure all your bases are covered, include the following details:

  • Requests about the birth
  • Requests before, during and after the delivery
  • Birth preference
  • Requests for your newborn’s care.

Requests before Birth

This may include numerous specifics such as what you’d want the atmosphere to be like. What your desires are and what you want to be permitted. Add specifics like who you’d want beside you, what you want to eat or drink during labor, would you want to walk around during labor, and whether you want to have a specific birthing position.

Requests During and After the Birth

This may include specifics on labor procedures and what you’re comfortable with. For example, what you’d like to wear while giving birth. You can choose to wear your own maternity delivery gown. You may also add details about the use of an epidural, or any pain medication. Also, add details on your decision on episiotomies versus natural tearing.

Birthing Preference – Vaginal vs. C-Section

Even if you’re going through with a vaginal birth, it doesn’t hurt to decide on the specifics of a C-section in case it is needed. Talk with your health care provider and discuss what your plan should be if your pregnancy becomes high risk, or if you require medical emergency during labor.

Request for Newborn’s Care

This may include numerous details regarding whether you’d like to hold the baby immediately after birth, if you plan to breastfeed immediately, when the cord should be cut and who should cut it, special requests about the placenta as well as postponing weighing the baby so you and your little one can greet one another properly.

Birthing plans are a great way for expectant parents to organize everything. By planning everything, having a go-bag ready and a hospital delivery gown after the baby arrives ironed and packed, you’ll have an easier time greeting you little one when they finally arrive!




Julie Berg
Julie Berg

Author




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